Ornamentation In Architecture

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Ornamentation, in architecture, applied embellishment in various styles that is a distinguishing characteristic of buildings, furniture, and household items. … Throughout antiquity and into the Renaissance, and later for religious buildings, applied ornament was very important, often having symbolic meaning.

In architecture and decorative art, ornament is a decoration used to embellish parts of a building or object.

Condemning ornament as a crime, modernism severed the symbiotic architecture/arts connection for nearly 80 years. Postmodernism reclaimed decoration as vital to composition, but the ornament/architecture relationship was practically reinvented. In contemporary architecture, this essential, complex and ambiguous …

“We’re well on the way to having architects as hairdressers,” warns architect and writer Neil Spiller. He’s talking about style. Exactly a century after Adolf Loos’ seminal text Ornament and Crime, architects are using digital technology to generate elaborate decoration. But what are they trying to say with all …

Yet there are pockets of resistance. One British practice in particular has consistently wrongfooted the architectural establishment and delighted many others in its bold adoption of ornament. London-based FAT (Fashion Architecture Taste) see ornament as an inherent and indispensable part of architecture.

Louis Sullivan. ORNAMENT IN ARCHITECTURE. I take it as self-evident that a building, quite devoid of ornament, may convey a noble and dignified sentiment by virtue of mass and proportion. It is not evident to me that ornament can intrinsically heighten these elemental qualities. Why, then, should we use ornament?

Wariness regarding ornaments began at the start of the 20th century. In his articles, including the famous “Ornaments and Crime” published in 1908, Austrian architect Adolf Loos was the first to introduce this form of radicalism in opposition to the Eclectic and Art Nouveau styles. Loos clearly influenced the Bauhaus and is …

Ornament begins as luxury. The more ornamented a building, a piece of clothing or an item of jewellery, the more labour has gone into its production and the more expensive it is. The Industrial Revolution and machine production changed everything. Suddenly decoration became cheap. Which coincided …

Three basic and fairly distinct categories of ornament in architecture may be recognized: mimetic, or imitative, ornament, the forms of which have certain definite meanings or symbolic significance; applied ornament, intended to add beauty to a structure but extrinsic to it; and organic ornament, inherent in the …

Author: ikilo