Ornamentation In Modern Architecture

image by iconeye

Contemporary architects are, however, increasingly engaging with ornamentation. The zenith was Grayson Perry and Charles Holland of FAT’s fairytale House for Essex (p64), but it does not serve as an indicator because the involvement of an artist has allowed an enhanced engagement with ornament …

Ornament in the twentieth century was linked to a wider debate about how to develop a new style representative of a rapidly changing society. Within the context of fin-de-siècle Vienna, the argument against the use of ornament led by architect Adolf Loos was highly influential on contemporary and later …

construction, to the high Gothic architectural times, when architecture meant cosmos expressed in monolith, ornament comes in the foreground as the sole shape and functionality of the stone material. The Gothic architecture, upon which modern architecture has based its ethical infrastructure, not only has united its …

In his De Gustibus column, Eric Felten writes that it’s time to replace stripped-down modern architecture with something more ornamented.

Modern millwork ornaments are made of wood, plastics, composites, etc. They come in many different colours and shapes. Modern architecture, conceived of as the elimination of ornament in favor of purely functional structures, left architects the problem of how to properly adorn modern …

Caruso St John is building a contemporary art museum in Nottingham with lace patterns embossed into its concrete surface, making reference to extinct local industry. Perforated facades, a feature fast becoming ubiquitous on new buildings, are sometimes fractilinear and abstract and sometimes figurative.

Condemning ornament as a crime, modernism severed the symbiotic architecture/arts connection for nearly 80 years. Postmodernism reclaimed decoration as vital to composition, but the ornament/architecture relationship was practically reinvented. In contemporary architecture, this essential, complex and ambiguous …

London-based FAT (Fashion Architecture Taste) see ornament as an inherent and indispensable part of architecture. Partner Charles Holland says: “The Loos argument is very interesting. As I understand it, he was saying that ornamentation was a waste of labour, effort and craft. With contemporary …

In his articles, including the famous “Ornaments and Crime” published in 1908, Austrian architect Adolf Loos was the first to introduce this form of radicalism in opposition to the Eclectic and Art Nouveau styles. Loos clearly influenced the Bauhaus and is thus considered as one of the great precursors of modern architecture.

Author: ikilo